Check Ball: Scootie Randall

Scootie Randall

Dionte Christmas scored over 2,000 points in his Temple career. Nearly 1,000 of those points came on 319 three-pointers, including 107 treys a year ago. The loss of Christmas' shooting ability may be impossible to replace, but 6-6 forward Andrew "Scootie" Randall is hoping to do his part.

Dionte Christmas scored over 2,000 points in his Temple career. Nearly 1,000 of those points came on 319 three-pointers, including 107 treys a year ago.

The loss of Christmas' shooting ability may be impossible to replace, but 6-6 forward Andrew "Scootie" Randall is hoping to do his part.

The Philadelphia product was seldom used as a freshman last year after scoring 1,735 points in his scholastic career at Communications Tech. He is spending the summer honing his skills in the Hank Gathers College League, with an eye towards improving his long-range shooting.

In a recent summer league contest, Randall finished 5 for 11 from the field, including a 3 for 5 mark from beyond the arc.

"With the loss of Christmas, it's possible we're going to need more three-point shooters on the court," said Randall, who considers himself and Christmas to be similar players. "That's been my main focus besides defense. Working with coach (Matt) Langel and watching Dionte Christmas play has helped me a lot."

Randall said his best position is at power forward, and he could fill a role similar to what reserve Craig Williams did last year as a big man who can shoot. Williams is expected to return this season, but is coming off a significant knee injury, and Randall could step in if Williams isn't healthy.

Frontcourt minutes will be available, regardless of Williams' situation, with the departure of center Sergio Olmos. Randall admits he anticipates a bump in playing time.

"I can fill the role of Craig, pick and pop like he does, but I'm more versatile than Craig," Randall said. "Playing the four, banging with the big guys, is my natural position. But I can step out and play the three. Hopefully I can play more than just the three and four."

Randall averaged just 1.2 points in 11 games as a freshman last year, playing over 10 minutes just once – in an early-season victory over Lafayette.

He admitted the role of deep reserve was a shock to his system.

"It was, coming from a place where I played a lot. But being in a program like this, it's worth waiting (for playing time)," Randall said. "We had some great seniors and I was just trying to be the best teammate possible. I kept working on my game and the coaches told me one day my name would be called."

Randall feels that time will be this year, playing a major role in replacing one of the greatest Owl players ever.

"That's just my mindset and confidence level," he said.

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